Poland’s New Law ‘Slams the Door’ on Holocaust Survivors’ Hopes for Restitution

Samuel Sokol is a freelance journalist based in Jerusalem. He was previously a correspondent at the Jerusalem Post and has reported for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Israel Broadcasting Authority and the Times of Israel. He is the author of Putin’s Hybrid War and the Jews.
Sam Sokol
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Samuel Sokol is a freelance journalist based in Jerusalem. He was previously a correspondent at the Jerusalem Post and has reported for the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, the Israel Broadcasting Authority and the Times of Israel. He is the author of Putin’s Hybrid War and the Jews.
Sam Sokol

Poland’s adoption Saturday of a controversial measure curtailing Holocaust-related restitution claims set off a firestorm in Israel and the wider Jewish world, sparking allegations of state-sponsored antisemitism and a rapidly escalating diplomatic crisis between Warsaw and Jerusalem.

Although the law says nothing about the Holocaust or World War II, it establishes that any administrative decision issued 30 years ago or more can no longer be challenged. This means that property owners who had their homes or a business seized in the communist era can no longer claim compensation.

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