Woman Who Ran One of Israel's Biggest Brothels to Serve Prison Time

As part of the plea agreement, Noi Hadad admitted to pimping in addition to tax offenses, money laundering and obstruction of justice

Noi Hadad, who for years ran one of Israel’s biggest brothels.
From Hadad's Facebook page

Noi Hadad, who for years ran one of Israel’s biggest brothels, signed a plea agreement on Thursday. She will be sentenced to two years in prison and pay a 50,000 shekel ($14,000) fine. As part of the agreement, Hadad admitted to pimping, and owning and managing "prostitution businesses," in addition to tax offenses, money laundering and obstruction of justice. Counts accusing her of causing others to become prostitutes were dropped.

Hadad confessed to running two brothels in Tel Aviv — one of the country's largest, at 36 Yitzhak Sadeh Street — and after that one was closed, another that she opened at 4 Tversky Street. She also agreed to testify against her former business partner, Sarit Agranova, whose case is still in progress.

Hadad and Agranova were arrested in June 2017 and indicted two weeks later, along with eight other people. Hadad will forfeit 850,000 shekels in assets and give up ownership of the building on Yitzhak Sadeh Street, which she bought in 2011 for 618,000 shekels. The building on Tversky Street was owned by Agranova’s husband, who was also indicted.

Two years is considered a light sentence for such crimes, but prosecutors agreed to it because of what was deemed “her complicated medical condition, her confession, accepting responsibility and a lack of a criminal record.” The maximum sentence for pimping and running a place of prostitution is five years in prison.

From right: Noi Hadad, her former business partner, Sarit Agranova, and Agranova's boyfriend at the Tel Aviv court house, May 2018.

Between 2013 and 2016, the brothel on Yitzhak Sadeh Street operated seven days a week in two daily shifts. It was located in a basement divided into nine small rooms, with a kitchenette and waiting room. Three to nine women worked each shift, providing prostitution services to two to 25 customers per shift. Each woman charged 250 shekels for up to 30 minutes. Half of that money allegedly went to Hadad and Agranova.

The revenues from the brothel during the three years it operated are estimated at 10 million shekels. It was closed by a court order in 2016. The brothel on Tversky Street then operated for two and a half years and its revenues are estimated at an additional 10 million shekels.

Hadad is only expected to enter prison to serve her sentence in about six months. On signing her plea agreement, the order holding her under house arrest was withdrawn. Her lawyer plans on requesting a pardon for Hadad from President Reuven Rivlin.

Other defendants in the case also signed plea agreements, including Hadad’s mother, Heli Sela, who was originally charged with money laundering. She agreed to a lesser charge of being an accessory to the crimes, but in the end, she was not convicted.

The woman who managed the brothels for Hadad and Agranova, Hana Amjar, also reached a plea agreement in which she confessed to pimping and managing a brothel. She will pay a fine of 3,500 shekels and will have 40,000 shekels of the more than 200,000 shekels in her possession when she was arrested confiscated. Two other women who worked in the brothels were also convicted and fined 3,500 shekels each.

The building which housed the brothel on 36 Yitzhak Sadeh Street, Tel Aviv, 2016.
Ofer Vaknin