Iran Assassination Doesn't Change the Balance: Israel Still Needs the U.S. and Biden

The killing of nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh changed the game just as Biden is set to enter the White House, but Jerusalem has to assume that Washington is taking plenty of notes

Amos Harel
Amos Harel
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Amos Harel
Amos Harel

A new, more combative tone is being heard in the press briefings from Jerusalem since the assassination of Iranian nuclear scientist Mohsen Fakhrizadeh on Friday. Israel is being portrayed as a major, almost omnipotent player in the Middle East.

Its intelligence and operational capabilities, as manifest in the operation, which the Iranians are attributing to the Mossad, enable it to dictate the course of events. If it wants, it will act again against targets in Iran. And even if it doesn’t choose to do so, it is capable of disrupting the resumption of negotiations between Iran and the United States once Joe Biden assumes the U.S. presidency on January 20.

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