Israelis Killed and Hurt in Terror Attacks Abroad to Be Recognized as Terror Victims

Until recently the law recognized as terror victims only victims of attacks that specifically targeted Israelis or Jews.

Brussels Airport in May.
Reuters / Francois Lenoir

Six Israelis who were killed and hurt in terror acts abroad will be recognized as victims of hostile acts, the Defense Ministry said Thursday. This means that these individuals and their families will receive financial assistance and treatment from the National Insurance Institute.

Until recently the law recognized as terror victims only victims of attacks that specifically targeted Israelis or Jews. The change was enabled by an amendment to the law, under which the state recognizes victims of attacks abroad as terror victims, providing one of the responsible organization’s declared goals is to target Israelis or Jews, even if the attacks weren’t directed specifically at Israelis or Jews.

The family members of some of the victims claimed the law’s former version discriminated against them, denying them assistance by the state. For example, the family members of Dalia Elyakim, who was killed in the car ramming attack in Berlin in December last year, claimed they were treated as though a relative of theirs had been killed in a traffic accident abroad.

The people and families who will be recognized as terror victims are: Shmuel Ben Hillel, who was murdered in Mali in November 2015; Chaim Winternitz, who was injured in Brussels in March 2016; Menachem Mendel Farkash, who was also hurt in Brussels, Dalia Elyakim, who was murdered in Berlin in December 2016, Rami Elyakim, who was hurt in the same attack in Berlin and Lian Nasser, who was murdered in Istanbul in January 2017.