Israeli Drone Crashes in Syria

The Sky Rider isn’t considered to be technologically advanced, and the army loses such aircraft from time to time due to technical faults.

An Israeli soldier with a Sky Rider drone, 2011.
IDF Spokesperson's Unit

An Israeli military drone crashed on Monday in Syria, which claimed that the Assad regime's army intercepted it. The IDF is investigating the incident and believes that the crash was the result of technical failure.

The unmanned aerial vehicle, known in Hebrew as Rochev Shamayim, or Sky Rider, in the IDF, isn’t considered to be technologically advanced, and the army stressed that its crash has no security ramifications.  

The Lebanese Hezbollah-affiliated Al-Manar website published phots of the drone. According to its report, Syrian army anti-aircraft weapons intercepted an unmanned spy plane over Quneitra in southern Syria.

The Sky Rider is a small drone operated by a unit in the artillery corps. Its function is to provide commanders in the field with intelligence updates. It includes a camera, and is not considered to be technologically advanced. When it crashes its encryption system is wiped off and it doesn’t pose an intelligence threat, therefore not constituting a particularly significant event.

Monday's drone crash wasn’t an unusual event, and the IDF loses such aircraft from time to time due to technical faults. Last December, a Sky Rider was discovered in the country's north six months after it had crashed over Israeli airspace. Due to technical failures, communications with it broke off and it crashed to the ground.