26th Victim of Femicide: Israeli Arab Mother of Three Murdered in Central Israel

Shadiya Musrati was shot to death at close range while walking down the street in Ramle; two suspects were detained in connection with the murder ■ Two other women in her family were murdered in 2006 and 2012

Jack Khoury
Lee Yaron
Bar Peleg
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The scene of the murder in Ramle, December 27, 2018.
Jack Khoury
Lee Yaron
Bar Peleg

A 29-year-old mother of three was shot to death on Thursday while walking down the street in Ramle.

The woman, identified as Shadiya Musrati, was shot at close range in her chest on the town’s Hannah Szenes Street and died of her injuries upon arrival at Yitzhak Shamir Medical Center outside Tel Aviv.

Two suspects, both relatives of the victim, were arrested after the murder  but all details concerning their identity are under a gag order. Their arrest was extended by five days. The two deny any connection to the murder.

Shadiya Musrati
Shadiya Musrati

Musrati is the third murder victim among the women of her family. Sana Musrati was murdered in 2006 at the age of 30 and her murder was never solved.

Nasreen Musrati was murdered in 2012 at the age of 27. She had fled her home after prolonged abuse by her husband and was shot to death in Kfar Yasif, where she was hiding. In 2014 the Haifa District Court convicted Adnan Zahada of murdering her for money.

>> Arab society is ripe for action against violence. Now its leaders must act | Analysis ■ Should Israel jail women who kill their abusive spouses? | Analysis

Last week, following the protest against the authorities’ failure in handling violence against women, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu authorized increasing the funding for the program against domestic violence from 30 to 50 million shekels in 2019.

This is part of the 250 million shekels earmarked for this program over the next five years, and will be devoted mainly to treating violent men.

The Knesset’s Constitution Committee this week authorized tougher penalties for men who murder their spouses. Under the new regulations, a man who murders his partner after prolonged abuse will be tried for murder in grievous circumstances, which carries a life sentence.

The committee also authorized reducing the maximum penalty of women who are convicted of murdering abusive partners. They will be liable to a maximum penalty of 15 years in prison instead of a life sentence.

The two changes are part of a Justice Ministry reform in the severity of manslaughter offenses and the penalties they carry.

A bill on the issue is expected to be submitted for final votes at a special Knesset plenum debate next week, despite the house’s dispersal ahead of new elections on April 9.

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