Hundreds Attend Funeral of Border Policewoman Killed in Jerusalem Terror Attack

Nineteen-year-old Hadar Cohen, a new recruit to the Border Police who was killed in an attack by three Palestinians at the Damascus Gate, is laid to rest in Yehud.

Haaretz
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People attend the funeral of Border Police officer Hadar Cohen at the military cemetery in Yehud on February 4, 2016.
People attend the funeral of Border Police officer Hadar Cohen at the military cemetery in Yehud on February 4, 2016.Credit: Moti Milrod
Haaretz

Hadar Cohen, the border policewoman who was killed just outside Jerusalem's Damascus Gate on Wednesday in a terror attack committed by three West Bank Palestinians, was laid to rest on Thursday at the military cemetery in Yehud, east of Tel Aviv.

Her assailants were armed with guns, knives and explosive charges. Security camera footage showed that she was shot in the back.

The funeral for the 19-year-old recent recruit to the Border Police was attended by hundreds of mourners, including her colleague from the police force, Ravit Miriashvilli, who was wounded in the attack. Others attending included Public Security Minister Gilad Erdan, Israel Police Commissioner Roni Alsheich and Border Police Commissioner Kobi Shabtai.

"You were a true hero, my beloved," her father, Ofer, said in eulogizing his daughter. "How can I take leave of you now?" Her sister Mor called the slain border policewoman "our light." Hadar Cohen is also survived by her mother and a brother.

Border policewoman Hadar Cohen, 19, who was killed in a terror attack in Jerusalem, February 3, 2016.
Border policewoman Hadar Cohen, 19, who was killed in a terror attack in Jerusalem, February 3, 2016.Credit: Courtesy

Cohen and Miriashvilli joined the Border Police just two months ago. On Wednesday, Cohen's aunt, Zehavit, took the Border Police to task for stationing new recruits without experience in the field at the Damascus Gate, which has been the scene of a number of terrorist attacks since the outbreak of the current violence in the fall. "They were still in basic training, didn't know the situation on the ground," she said. "They were still small girls." For its part, the Border Police said the two had completed the training that allowed them to be deployed.

Hadar Cohen's aunt said her niece had been eager to join the Border Police and aspired to be a commander. "Everything that she had wanted, she achieved."

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