44 Percent of Israelis Dissatisfied With Emergency Room Visits, Poll Finds

Larger hospitals registered the highest ratings in the Health Ministry survey of the nation's 26 hospitals.

Uriel Sinai

A Health Ministry survey has found 44 percent of people in Israel dissatisfied after their visits to the emergency room, and that 41 percent of patients say they wouldn't recommend the ER where they were treated to anyone else.

The poll of more than 10,000 patients treated at 26 hospitals, found 54 percent said they felt their wait time was short or reasonable.

About a third said the explanations they received for continued treatment weren't clear. Forty-five percent said staff members didn't identify themselves by name or role, and 31 percent thought there was a lack of cooperation on the part of medical staff in the emergency room.

Respondents were questioned over periods of up to two weeks past their emergency room visits. Those who had emergency treatment on Sundays were the most dissatisfied patients, while over the weekends satisfaction levels were higher, which matches the fact that hospital activity is generally greatest on Sundays.

The poll focused on the six largest hospitals, Ichilov in Tel Aviv, Hadassah Ein Karem in Jerusaelm, Soroka in Be'er Sheva, Beilinson in Petah Tikvah, Rambam in Haifa and Sheba-Tel Hashomer.

Wait time was the weakest link for the larger hospitals, but 75 percent were satisfied with the respectful treatment they felt they received at these medical centers. More than 53 percent on average expressed general satisfaction with their emergency room visits.

Of the larger hospitals, Hadassah Ein Karem came in first with a 63.1 percent satisfaction rating, followed by Sheba with 55.3 percent and Ichilov with 55.1 percent.