Charlie Hebdo's Next Edition to Go Out in 1 Million Copies

French media outlets help to publish newest issue of satirical magazine, after an attack on its offices killed eight of its staff, four others.

AFP

Charlie Hebdo will publish its next edition on Wednesday, a lawyer for the French satirical magazine told the AFP news agency, despite the deadly shooting at its Paris headquarters.

One million copies will be printed, lawyer Richard Malka said, far above the magazine's usual circulation that numbers in the tens of thousands.

Eight Charlie Hebdo journalists were killed in the attack on Wednesday, including the editor and several well-known cartoonists.

The magazine's website was changed on Thursday to say that the survivors' edition was being published "because the pencil will always be above barbarism ... because freedom is a universal right ... because you support us."

French media outlets are helping to publish the issue, which will have eight pages instead of the normal 16, Malka said.

Former editor Philippe Val, who led Charlie Hebdo from 1992 to 2009, warned against "silence" following the attack.

"We have to keep working," he told the broadcaster BFMTV.

"Silence is fear," he added. "Fear cannot descend upon people who are citizens of a democracy, proud of living in a place where we are free, where we can express ourselves freely, where we can ridicule things that are ridiculous."

Many newspapers were reprinting Charlie Hebdo cartoons in the wake of the shooting.

The left-leaning magazine was launched in 1970 to succeed the Hara-Kiri weekly, which was banned over content deemed highly offensive by French authorities.

Charlie Hebdo often found itself in legal hot water, taking aim at the major world religions, politicians and celebrities.

The paper's offices had been firebombed in 2011, after it issued an edition "guest-edited" by the prophet Mohammed.