Argentina Votes to Dissolve Intelligence Agency After Alberto Nisman's Death

President Kirchner had proposed the move. Government had said a renegade spy was linked to AMIA prosecutor's death.

Reuters

Argentina's Congress has voted to scrap the country's intelligence agency and replace it with a new one, media reports say.

President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner proposed the move last month, after a special prosecutor, Alberto Nisman, was shot dead.

The government has said a renegade spy was linked to Nisman's death, the BBC reported.

Nisman died just before he was about to brief Congress on his accusation that Kirchner tried to cover up Iran's role in the 1994 bombing of a Buenos Aires Jewish community center.

The cover-up was designed to ensure a deal under which Iran would supply oil to Argentina in return for grain, Nisman had charged.

Kirchner has said that Antonio Stiuso, the country's chief of counterintelligence, manipulated Nisman into making the allegations against her, Reuters reported. She said he was then involved in his death. Stiuso has left the country, Reuters reported.

On Thursday the lower house of Congress voted 131 to 71 in favor of the bill, the BBC reported.

The Senate earlier this month had passed the bill, which replaces the SI Intelligence Secretariat with a service called the Federal Intelligence Agency, Reuters reported.

Opposition lawmakers said they were concerned that under the proposal, oversight of wiretaps is transferred to the general attorney's office from the intelligence service, the BBC reported.

These legislators said ties between the government and the general attorney are too close, the BBC reported.