New Study Solves the Mystery of Dead Sea Scrolls Site

Nir Hasson
Nir Hasson
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Nir Hasson
Nir Hasson

Among the tens of thousands of documents that were found in the 19th century in the Cairo Geniza, a collection of ancient Hebrew manuscripts, the largest and most important of their kind were two copies of a puzzling, handwritten manuscript that was labeled the Damascus Document.

This manuscript was believed to have been written in the 10th century C.E. and includes divine warnings, apocalyptic descriptions and religious rites. Some of the fog around this manuscript was dispersed 70 years later with the finding of the Dead Sea Scrolls. One of the scrolls that was found in the Qumran caves was the Damascus Document. In other words, this text originated with the sect that lived beside the Dead Sea.

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