Iran Has Diluted Half of Its Most-enriched Uranium Supply, Says IAEA

Iran complying with terms of deal with world powers, despite delay on nuclear conversion plant.

Reuters
Reuters
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Iran's President Rohani, left, meeting UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.
Iran's President Rohani, left, meeting UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon.Credit: Reuters
Reuters
Reuters

Iran is complying with the terms of last year's interim nuclear agreement with six world powers and is continuing to reduce its most sensitive uranium stockpile, a monthly update from the UN atomic agency obtained by Reuters showed on Thursday.

But the report by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which has a pivotal role in verifying that Iran is living up to its part of the deal, also indicated a delay in the commissioning of a nuclear conversion plant that Tehran needs to fulfill all parts of the six-month agreement by the time it ends on July 20.

Under the landmark accord that took effect on January 20, Iran curbed some parts of its nuclear program in exchange for a limited easing of sanctions that have battered the oil producer's economy.

The IAEA update showed that Iran had - as stipulated by the November 24 agreement with the United States, France, Germany, Britain, China and Russia - diluted half of its higher-grade enriched uranium stockpile to a less proliferation-sensitive fissile concentration.

The accord was designed to buy time for talks on a permanent settlement of the decade-old dispute over nuclear activities that Iran says are peaceful but the West fears may be aimed at developing an atomic bomb capability. Those talks got under way in February and the next meeting is due on May 13 in Vienna.

Click the alert icon to follow topics:

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

SUBSCRIBE
Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

The projected rise in sea level on a beach in Haifa over the next 30 years.

Facing Rapid Rise in Sea Levels, Israel Could Lose Large Parts of Its Coastline by 2050

Prime Minister Yair Lapid, this month.

Lapid to Haaretz: ‘I Have Learned to Respect the Left’

“Dubi,” whose full name is secret in keeping with instructions from the Mossad.

The Mossad’s Fateful 48 Hours Before the Yom Kippur War

Tal Dilian.

As Israel Reins in Its Cyberarms Industry, an Ex-intel Officer Is Building a New Empire

Queen Elizabeth II, King Charles III and a British synagogue.

How the Queen’s Death Changes British Jewry’s Most Distinctive Prayer