Chinese 'Black Coal, Thin Ice' Wins Best Film in Berlin

Wes Anderson takes home the Jury Grand Prix for "The Grand Budapest Hotel."

Reuters
DPA
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DPA

The Chinese film "Bai Ri Yan Huo" (Black Coal, Thin Ice) won the Golden Bear for best picture at the Berlin International Film Festival on Saturday, while American Richard Linklater was named Best Director for his film "Boyhood."

The Jury Grand Prix, the festival's second most prestigious award, went to U.S. director Wes Anderson for "The Grand Budapest Hotel," which is set against the backdrop of the buildup to World War Two.

Liao Fan won the prize for best actor in "Black Coal, Thin Ice" while Haru Kuroki won best actress for her role in the Japanese film "The Little House."

The awards were decided by an eight-person jury headed by American director and producer James Schamus after a festival lasting 11 days in which some 400 films were screened, 23 of them in the competition category.

Diao Yinan director of "Bai Ri Yan Huo" (Black Coal, Thin Ice) poses with his Golden Bear for Best Film next to actor Liao Fan who received the Silver Bear for Best Actor.Credit: Reuters

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