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Gaash Golfer Follows Albatross With Tournament-winning Form

Tomer Koren wins with a one over par score of 71.

Shmulik Futeran
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Shmulik Futeran

Tomer Koren, after scoring an albatross in the July monthly medal at the Gaash Golf Club, came back in the August tournament to take first place on Tuesday.

Koren won with a one over par gross 71. He played the front nine in an even 35 strokes, scoring an eagle, six pars and two bogeys. He then came in the back nine with a one over par 36, which included two birdies, four pars and three bogeys.

In the A division Steve Taylor, Raphy Harroche and Greg Elliot all finished the day with a net 74. First place went to Taylor, followed by Harroche on the count back.

Rafi Thein won the B division with a net 71, followed by Avraham Levy on net 72.

The C division was taken by Rotem Yakir with a net 63, who bested by nine strokes second-place Reuven Avital.

Nearest to the pin prizes went to Avraham Levy and Meyer Iny.

IN THE SWING: Tomer Koren on the fairway at the Gaash Golf Club on Tuesday. Shmulik FuteranCredit: שמוליק פיוטרן

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