Syrian Rebels Blame Weapons Depot Attack on 'Foreign Forces'

Free Syrian Army says they didn't carry out the attack though they did identify newly supplied Yakhont missiles being stored there.

Reuters
Reuters
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Reuters
Reuters

Syrian rebels on Tuesday accused foreign forces of destroying the advanced Russian anti-ship missiles in Syria last week, rejecting claims that the attack had been carried out by opposition fighters.

Qassem Saadeddine, spokesman for the Free Syrian Army's Supreme Military Council, said a pre-dawn strike on Friday hit a Syrian navy barracks at Safira, near the port of Latakia. He said that the rebel forces' intelligence network had identified newly supplied Yakhont missiles being stored there.

"It was not the FSA that targeted this," Saadeddine told Reuters. "It is not an attack that was carried out by rebels... This attack was either by air raid or long-range missiles fired from boats in the Mediterranean," he said.

Rebels described huge blasts - the ferocity of which, they said, was beyond the firepower available to them but consistent with that of a modern military like Israel's.

As it appears now, Israel had no involvement in the attack.

The Syrian government has not commented on the incident, beyond a state television report noting a "series of explosions" at the site.

According to regional intelligence sources, the Israelis previously struck in Syria at least three times this year to prevent the transfer of advanced weaponry from President Bashar Assad's army to Iranian-backed Hezbollah fighters in Lebanon.

Such weaponry, Israeli officials have made clear, would include the long-range Yakhonts, which could help Hezbollah repel Israel's navy and endanger its offshore gas rigs. In May, Israel and its U.S. ally complained about Moscow sending the missiles to Syria. Israel said they would likely end up with Hezbollah. The Lebanese group has said it does not need them.

Asked about the Latakia blasts, Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Yaalon told reporters: "We have set red lines in regards to our own interests, and we keep them. There is an attack here, an explosion there, various versions - in any event, in the Middle East it is usually we who are blamed for most."

A former senior Israeli security official, who declined to be named, told Reuters that the area of Latakia in question was known to have been used to store Yakhont missiles.

Technically at war with Syria, Israel spent decades in a stable standoff with Damascus while the Assad family ruled unchallenged. It has been reluctant to intervene openly in the two-year-old, Islamist-dominated insurgency rocking Syria.

But previous air strikes near Damascus, on Jan. 30, May 3 and May 5, made little attempt to conceal Israel's involvement.

A Google map image showing where the blasts were reportedly heard. Credit: Google Maps

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