South Iran Blast Wounds Several People, Cause Unknown

The port, one of Iran's major import and export terminals, is located in oil-rich Khuzestan province, the scene of occasional protests in recent years by members of Iran's Arabic-speaking minority seeking more rights.

Reuters
Reuters
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Reuters

An unexplained explosion at a port in southern Iran wounded several people, the Iranian semi-official news agency ILNA reported late Saturday.

The blast also damaged several cars and shattered windows of nearby buildings including a hotel in Imam Khomeini port, some 1,000 kilometers (620 miles) southwest of Tehran, according to the report.

The port, one of Iran's major import and export terminals, is located in oil-rich Khuzestan province, the scene of occasional protests in recent years by members of Iran's Arabic-speaking minority seeking more rights.

Iran in the past has blamed explosions in the province on saboteurs tied to Arab and Western intelligence agencies.

An Iranian security guard stands at the Maroun Petrochemical plant at the Imam Khomeini port, southwestern Iran, Sept. 28, 2011.Credit: AP

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