Poll: Most Israelis Oppose Attack on Iran Nuclear Facilities

Survery conducted by Israel Democracy Institute and TAU Mediation and Conflict Resolution program finds only 27% of Jewish Israeli support strike, and most think it's unlikely Israel will soon attack.

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A majority of Jewish Israelis oppose an attack on Iran's nuclear facilities without U.S. cooperation, and think it is unlikely Israel will soon launch a unilateral strike against the Islamic Republic, a poll released Thursday has found.

Some 61 per cent of those questioned oppose an Israeli strike, compared to 27 per cent in favor, the poll by the Israel Democracy Institute and Tel Aviv University's Evens Program in Mediation and Conflict Resolution found.

In addition, 56 per cent think the chances are low that Israel would launch such a strike unilaterally, compared to 33 per cent who assume Israel will go ahead anyway.

The poll, conducted last week, interviewed 516 respondents and had a 4.5 per cent margin of error.

Speculation, fueled by a flurry of reports and analysis in Israeli media, has snowballed in recent days that a unilateral Israeli attack on Iran is only a matter of months, or even weeks.

Israel sees a nuclear-armed Iran as an existential threat, pointing to repeated statements by Iranian leaders that the Jewish state should be wiped off the map.

Iran denies Western allegations that it is seeking to build a nuclear weapon and insists that its nuclear program is solely for peaceful purposes.

A worker in the nuclear power plant in Bushehr, Iran. Credit: AP

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