Uruguay Plans to Recognize Palestinian State

Joining Argentina, Brazil and Bolivia, Uraguay Foreign Minister Luis Almagro says his country is studying implications of decision with regard to international law.

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Uruguay's foreign minister says his country plans to join Argentina, Brazil and Bolivia in recognizing a Palestinian state.

Foreign Minister Luis Almagro told reporters on Thursday that the decision to formally recognize a sovereign Palestinian state has been taken, though officials are studying the implications of that decision with regard to international law and politics.

Uruguay's Foreign Affairs Minister Luis Almagro, right, arrives for a press conference in Montevideo, Uruguay, Friday Nov. 19, 2010.Credit: AP Photo / Matilde Campodonico

Almagro doesn't say if Jerusalem will be recognized as capital of the state, or what borders might be recognized.

He says the declaration will be made at the beginning of 2011.

Palestinians have been seeking international recognition of a state at a time when talks on a long-term peace settlement with Israel are deadlocked.

On Wednesday Bolivian President Evo Morales announced that his country had formally recognized Palestine as an independent and sovereign state within the 1967 borders. Reports last week indicated that such a decision was imminent.

Morales told a press conference at the presidential palace in La Paz that he planned to write to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, informing him of the decision.

Earlier this month, Brazil, Venezuela and Argentina recognized Palestine as an independent state within its borders prior to 1967, in decisions that the United States and Israel slammed as counterproductive and damaging.

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