Eric Gagne Caps Perfect Season by Winning Cy Young Award

Los Angeles Dodgers closer Eric Gagne capped off perfect season yesterday by becoming the first relief pitcher in 11 years to capture the National League's Cy Young award.

Reuters
Reuters
Send in e-mailSend in e-mail
Reuters
Reuters

Los Angeles Dodgers closer Eric Gagne capped off perfect season yesterday by becoming the first relief pitcher in 11 years to capture the National League's Cy Young award.

With a spectacular 55-for-55 in save opportunities, the burly 27-year-old Canadian received 28 first place votes and overall 146 points in balloting conducted by the Baseball Writers Association of America, easily outdistancing San Francisco Giants ace Jason Schmidt with 73 points.

Gagne becomes the ninth relief pitcher - and the first since Oakland's Dennis Eckersley in 1992 - to take home the Cy Young and the first Dodger to claim the honor since Orel Hershiser in 1988.

Only the second Canadian to collect the award after Ferguson Jenkins, the Montreal native's victory snapped Arizona Diamondbacks ace Randy Johnson's four-year stranglehold on the trophy.

While relievers seldom receive recognition from Cy Young voters, Gagne's season and stunning numbers could not be ignored. Gagne's 55 saves tied the NL single season record set by John Smoltz and were just two shy of Bobby Thigpen's all-time mark.

The big right-hander, the only reliever in Major League history with two 50-save seasons, also produced when the Dodgers needed him most, going 1-0 with 24 saves and miniscule 0.24 ERA after the All-Star break as Los Angeles chased a place in the post season. He finished the season with a 2-3 record, 1.20 ERA in 77 appearances and 137 strikeouts in 87 1/3 innings.

Comments

SUBSCRIBERS JOIN THE CONVERSATION FASTER

Automatic approval of subscriber comments.
From $1 for the first month

SUBSCRIBE
Already signed up? LOG IN

ICYMI

בנימין נתניהו השקת ספר

Netanyahu’s Israel Is About to Slam the Door on the Diaspora

עדי שטרן

Head of Israel’s Top Art Academy Leads a Quiet Revolution

Charles Lindbergh addressing an America First Committee rally on October 3, 1941.

Ken Burns’ Brilliant ‘The U.S. and the Holocaust’ Has Only One Problem

Skyscrapers in Ramat Gan and Tel Aviv.

Israel May Have Caught the Worst American Disease, New Research Shows

ג'אמיל דקוור

Why the Head of ACLU’s Human Rights Program Has Regrets About Emigrating From Israel

ISRAEL-VOTE

Netanyahu’s Election Win Dealt a Grievous Blow to Judaism