Haaretz History

On December 31, 1922 an event took place in Palestine that changed the face of Hebrew culture: the last issue of the daily Haaretz was printed in Jerusalem. The next day, the paper was published in Tel Aviv and it has been there since then, one of the cornerstones of the capital of Zionist culture.

On December 31, 1922 an event took place in Palestine that changed the face of Hebrew culture: the last issue of the daily Haaretz was printed in Jerusalem. The next day, the paper was published in Tel Aviv and it has been there since then, one of the cornerstones of the capital of Zionist culture.

Mordechai Naor, who writes about the move to Tel Aviv in the new issue of Kesher, a periodical devoted to Jewish journalism and communications, describes the roots of the Kulturkampf that is still evident today. The three years during which Haaretz was published in Jerusalem caused it financial damage, and its editors and contributors suffered from what they saw as the closed-mindedness of the city. One of them, Revisionist leader Ze'ev Jabotinsky, later recalled that he would travel to Tel Aviv occasionally "in order to breathe free cultural air."

Tel Aviv welcomed the paper; the municipality granted it financial support in the form of advance payment for future advertisements. Haaretz did not return the favor, however: Several of the city fathers complained that the municipality was portrayed in the newspaper as though it were "almost a monster" and they demanded that the assistance be stopped. But the large wave of immigration that began in 1924 led to prosperity in Tel Aviv, and with the establishment of the daily Davar, it became the capital of the Hebrew media.