Cabinet to Vote on 'Weekday Kashrut' for Restaurants That Open on Shabbat

Amendment would change law to specify that the sole consideration for kashrut certification is the food it serves, and no other criteria.

Emil Salman

The Ministerial Committee on Legislation is scheduled to vote Monday on an amendment that would allow establishments that adhere to Jewish dietary law but are open on the Sabbath to obtain weekday-only kashrut certificates.

The proposal, which is based on rulings by important Zionist rabbis, will enable many more restaurants be kosher and, bottom line, to present a Judaism that unites rather than repels, said the sponsor of the amendment, MK Elazar Stern (Hatnuah).

While the Kashrut Fraud Prevention Law stipulates that only the religious provisions governing kashrut are to be considered when issuing a kashrut certificate, it does not clearly define these provisions.

As a result, kashrut supervisors sometimes withhold permits from establishments for holding what they consider to be immodest performances or events that conflict with religious law.

The amendment would change the law to specify that the sole consideration for kashrut certification is the food it serves.

As for restaurants being open on Shabbat, the amendment cites practices adopted by local governments in northern Israel are cited, permitting weekday-only kashrut permits.