Canadians, Terror Victims Hike Across Israel to Raise Awareness

A sea-to-sea trek for terror victims; food donations made easier; sustainability, peace and then some.

Steve Klein
Steven Klein
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Canada’s ambassador to Israel, Vivian Bercovici, third from right, with other participants in a OneFamily fund-raising hike, November 2014.Credit: OneFamily
Steve Klein
Steven Klein

HIKING FOR TERROR VICTIMS: Nearly 50 Canadians and over 100 Israeli terror victims gathered for the eighth annual OneFamily Cross Israel Hike last week. The event, a challenging five-day sea-to-sea trek from the white chalk hills of Rosh Hanikra to Lake Kinneret, raised $200,000, not to mention awareness for terror victims, a OneFamily official told Haaretz on Thursday. “Hiking is a perfect way to show our solidarity. By supporting victims of terror, we help them heal one step at a time, one family at a time,” said Julie Schwartz, a Toronto native and an eight-time event participant. The most high-profile member of the OneFamily group was Canada’s ambassador to Israel, Vivian Bercovici, who said the NGO was doing “important and life-altering” work.

FURTHERING FOOD DONATION: Food bank Leket Israel marked World Food Day on Tuesday by lobbying Knesset members to adopt its proposed Good Samaritan Food Donation Act. “The proposed legislation for the first-ever Good Samaritan Food Donation Act in Israel will allow Leket Israel, for example, to collect at least three times more hot meals annually, meaning 4.5 million meals every year,” Leket Israel founder and New Jersey native Joseph Gitler told a committee. The act “protects food donors who want to donate food to Leket and nonprofits Leket partners with for distribution, as long as they give their food in good faith and we handle the food properly,” said Leket’s Deena Fiedler. Businesses are afraid to donate food lest they be liable if someone gets sick from food they contribute, she added.

POETS GET A WORD IN ON PEACE: About 20 Israeli writers, musicians and artists joined forces Thursday night “to promote cooperation, dialogue, sustainability and peace as shared goals,” the movement 100,000 Poets for Change announced. The 20 who gathered at the Jerusalem House of Quality for a poetry reading are native English speakers. The American contingent included Esther Cameron, Michael Dickel, Geula Geurts, Rachel Heimowitz, Deena Levenstein, Emmy Raviv, and Mike Stone. Meanwhile, Avril Meallem and Michael E. Stone both hail from Britain, while Soviet-born Ruth Sager was raised in Australia, Papua New Guinea and the United States. “To paraphrase a Leonard Bernstein quote I recently saw on social media, when the individual changes, and lots of individuals change, that changes society and the culture,” said Dickel, the chairman of the Israel Association of Writers in English.

Rank and File was compiled by Steven Klein.
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