Jordan's King Abdullah Refusing Netanyahu's Phone Calls Over Al-Aqsa

King reportedly wants to prevent Israel from using phone calls to give impression that two countries are coordinating their reaction to escalating tensions on Temple Mount.

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Jordan's King Abdullah II arrives at Seoul Airport in South Korea, September 10, 2015.Credit: AP

Jordan's King Abdullah has ordered his bureau chief not to pass along phone calls from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu regarding the recent incidents at the Al-Aqsa Mosque.

Haaretz has learned that King Abdullah has told guests in recent days that he refuses to take phone calls from Netanyahu, to prevent Israel from using them to give the impression that the two nations were coordinating their reactions to the ongoing violence on the hilltop complex referred to by Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary, and called the Temple Mount by Jews.

The London-based Rai al Youm newspaper quoted on Thursday morning sources from within Jordan's royal palace, confirming that the king has refused to take calls from Netanyahu and hear about incidents occurring on Al-Aqsa, although he did meet on Sunday with Arab-Israeli lawmakers to discussed the ongoing escalation on the Temple Mount and the claims that Israel has been coordinating with the Hashemite kingdom.

During the meeting, Abdullah said that Al-Aqsa Mosque was open for Muslims only and cannot be shared. "I'll say once and for all, there is no partnership, no division, Al-Aqsa is a Muslim place of worship," he told the lawmakers from the Joint Arab List.

Last week, King Abdullah spoke with U.S. Vice President Joe Biden and asked the American administration to state a clear position on the recurring violence in Jerusalem's Old City and the Temple Mount. The King also asked Biden to act against "the ongoing Israeli policies at the Al-Aqsa Mosque and end the aggression."

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