Anti-Jewish and pro-Netanyahu's Son: The Bizarre Story of the neo-Nazi Behind The Daily Stormer

Anglin’s Daily Stormer takes its name from Der Stürmer, a newspaper that published Nazi propaganda. The site includes sections called 'Jewish Problem' and 'Race War'

Andrew Anglin, wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat on January 16, 2016
Andrew Anglin, wearing a "Make America Great Again" hat on January 16, 2016 Wiki Commons, BFG101

Yair Netanyahu, the son of Israel's prime minister, has a new highly controversial fan after he posted an anti-Semitic meme: the avowed white supremacist and online blogger Andrew Anglin.

Anglin's website is currently running a banner declaring itself, "The World's #1 Yair Netanyahu fansite."  Anglin’s site takes its name from Der Stürmer, a newspaper that published Nazi propaganda. The site includes sections called “Jewish Problem” and “Race War.”

The Daily Stormer's owner says he "stands with" Benjamin Netanyahu's son Haaretz

Anglin, 32, created Daily Stormer - billed as “The World’s Most Genocidal Republican Website” - in 2013. Anglin is a central figure in the white nationalist movement in the United States and has been in hiding since a lawsuit was filed against him in April by the Southern Poverty Law Center. 

Main banner of neo-Nazi website Daily Stormer praising Yair Netanyahu, the son of Israel's prime minister, September 12, 2017

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Daily Stormer however doesn't have many fans among internet domain hosts - the servers need to keep a website on the internet. An Austrian company has revoked the domain name of the website was previously rejected by internet hosts in the United States.

Monika Pink-Rank, a spokeswoman for Austrian domain registry nic.at, said The Daily Stormer's domain was removed on Monday after Austrian politicians reported the white supremacist platform's presence.

The website has been looking for a home since its publisher mocked the counter-protester who was killed during the Confederate monument protests in Charlottesville, Virginia last month.

Anglin in hiding

In April, a Montana woman sued Anglin for orchestrating an anti-Semitic online trolling campaign against her family. Nearly three months later, her attorneys are still trying to find him.

A court filing Friday by lawyers from the Southern Poverty Law Center claims The Daily Stormer’s founder, Andrew Anglin, is “actively concealing his whereabouts” and hasn’t been served with Tanya Gersh’s federal lawsuit. Gersh’s attorneys are asking for more time to find Anglin so the case won’t be temporarily dismissed.

The suit claims anonymous internet trolls bombarded Gersh’s family with hateful and threatening messages after Anglin published their personal information in a post accusing her and other Jewish residents of Whitefish, Montana, of engaging in an “extortion racket” against the mother of white nationalist Richard Spencer.

The Daily Stormer used a crowdfunding website, WeSearchr, to raise more than $152,000 in donations from nearly 2,000 contributors to help pay for Anglin’s legal expenses.

Gersh’s lawsuit said she agreed to help Spencer’s mother sell commercial property she owns in Whitefish amid talk of a protest outside the building. Sherry Spencer, however, later accused Gersh of threatening and harassing her into agreeing to sell the property.

Gersh’s lawyers from the Alabama-based law center say her suit must be dismissed on procedural grounds if Anglin isn’t served with a copy of it by July 17, but the court can extend that deadline.

The law center’s lawyers said they have looked for him at four addresses in Franklin County, Ohio, for which he apparently has a connection. Gersh’s attorneys say they also tried in vain to contact Anglin’s Las Vegas-based attorney, Marc Randazza, and confirm that he is authorized to accept service of the lawsuit on Anglin’s behalf.

Randazza questioned whether the lawyers’ request for a deadline extension is a “stunt.”

“If they can’t serve him, I question whether they are actually trying,” Randazza told The Associated Press in July. “We’re going to defend (against) the case.”

The suit accuses Anglin of invading Gersh’s privacy, intentionally inflicting “emotional distress” and violating a Montana anti-intimidation law. As of late August the suit against Anglin remains "stuck" as his disappearance has made the case impossible to litigate reports the New York Times.