Ivanka Trump on Charlottesville: No Place in Society for Racism, White Supremacy and neo-Nazis

While President Donald Trump has noticeably refrained from condemning white supremacists by name, his daughter didn't hold back following the Charlottesville violence

Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to President Donald Trump, listens as her father, President Donald Trump, August 11, 2017, at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J.
Ivanka Trump, the daughter and assistant to President Donald Trump, listens as her father, President Donald Trump, August 11, 2017, at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

U.S. President Donald Trump's daughter Ivanka addressed the violence of the preceding day at a white nationalist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, on Sunday morning, writing, "There should be no place in society for racism, white supremacy and neo-Nazis."

The White House adviser added, "We must all come together as Americans – and be one country UNITED. #Charlottesville."

Speaking on Saturday about the incident, the president commented, "We condemn in the strongest possible terms this egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence – on many sides, on many sides," Trump said. He received criticism for refraining to squarely blame white supremacists for the incidents. 

The mayor of Charlottesville, Michael Signer, went so far as to blame the president and his administration for the violence. “I’m not going to make any bones about it,” he said. “I place the blame for a lot of what you’re seeing in America today right at the doorstep of the White House and the people around the president.”

Trump posted a series of tweets of his own expressing sorrow over the loss of life in Charlottesville, writing in one, "No matter our color, creed, religion or political party, we are ALL AMERICANS FIRST."

His predecessor, Barack Obama, quoted late South African President Nelson Mandela on Twitter, writing: "No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin or his background or his religion. People must learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love. For love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite."