Yeshiva University Law School Vows 'Sanctuary Protection' for Immigrant Students

The university, long a seat of modern Orthodoxy, also pledges to respect the privacy of all students and faculty and not disclose any information about them 'without a subpoena or court order.'

Yeshiva University's David H. Zysman Hall.
Yeshiva University's David H. Zysman Hall. Wikimedia Commons

Yeshiva University has pledged to provide "sanctuary protection and financial support" for undocumented students, staff or faculty, the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law has announced.

The statement quoted an email from the university's president, Richard M. Joel, in response to a petition signed by more than 200 Cardozo students and faculty in light of President Donald Trump's campaign pledges to restrict immigration and just ahead of his actual temporarytravel ban on seven Muslim-majority nations, issued on Friday.

The university is a flagship school of Orthodox Judaism, but has a diverse student body.

"I want to state clearly that we are committed to protecting the privacy of our students, staff and faculty to the fullest extent allowed by law," Joel wrote. He added that the school would continue to abide by its policy "not to disclose any private information about our students, faculty or staff unless we are presented with a subpoena or court order."

Separately, Joel issued a statement implying criticism of Trump's temporary travel ban.

"There is continuing turmoil regarding US immigration policy. Yeshiva University is unwavering in its support of religious rights and societal values. Ensuring spiritual and personal freedoms are fundamental to the country, our community and our university," Joel wrote.

"The University is monitoring these developments closely and will keep you apprised of changes that might affect students and faculty. In the meantime, we advise against travel to the seven countries named in this new policy due to the current uncertainty about readmission to the U.S.," the statement added.