'Open' sign
No matter what the hour, be prepared to see a lot of 'open' signs in Tel Aviv. Photo by Bloomberg
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Like in many Mediterranean cities, nightlife in Tel Aviv starts late, which can take some visitors by surprise. Many popular bars are classed as “dance bars,” where you have the choice of strutting your stuff on the (usually packed) dance floor or taking a seat at a bar or table. If you want to ensure you have a place to park your posterior, make sure you arrive by 9 P.M, which is when most dance bars open their doors.

The price you'll pay for scoring a seat, however, is that you'll need to wait a while before the party gets going. And at some clubs, you can't even walk in before 11 P.M., so check out a venue's hours before making the trek in your stilettos.

Although places tend to fill up at around 11 P.M., peak hours tend to be between 1-3 A.M., so don't rush. You can safely arrive well into the witching hours, although it might mean standing in line for a while before finally passing through the rope barrier and into the club.

Even on weekdays, some bars stay up past bedtime. It's on the weekend, however, that Tel Aviv really becomes a city for night owls, with patrons still to be found propping up the bar at 5 or 6 A.M.

In fact, with hours like these it may be worth sneaking in a disco nap at home so you can stay out for the long haul.