Ruth David. The extension of her term may be held up.
Ruth David. The extension of her term may be held up. Photo by Archive: Uriel Cohen / BauBau
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State Comptroller Micha Lindenstrauss will publish his comprehensive report on wiretapping next Monday, and legal sources predicted yesterday that its findings could affect some careers.

In particular, they said, it could influence State Prosecutor Moshe Lador's decision to extend Tel Aviv District Attorney Ruth David's tenure by another year, as well as Police Commissioner David Cohen's decision to promote Chief Superintendent Eran Kamin.

Both were involved in the incident that sparked Lindenstrauss' probe - the failure to hand over wiretapped materials to defense attorneys for former minister Haim Ramon, or even to inform the defense of their existence.

Ramon, who was ultimately convicted of forcibly kissing a female soldier, claimed at the time that the omission was deliberate.

Lapse not deliberate

In an interim report published last year, Lindenstrauss found fault with the conduct of both David and Kamin, as well as that of prosecutor Ariela Segal-Antler and then-senior police official Miri Golan. However, he did not conclude that the lapse had been deliberate.

Lador's decision to extend David's eight-year term, which was originally supposed to have ended this summer, by another year has already sparked controversy, in part due to Lindenstrauss' conclusions in his interim report.

As Kamin's promotion had been put on hold until the interim report was published, a harsher final report could affect him as well.

A copy of the report has already been given to Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein.

The State Prosecutor's Office said in response that "there is no basis to the speculations" about the possible impact on David's appointment.

The police said it has "no intention of violating the embargo [on publishing anything from the report before Monday] by a premature discussion of the report's findings and ramifications."