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Security cameras at the strip club Major General Eliezer Marom patronized captured the navy chief with a performer on his knees, said anonymous sources from the club. This suggests that the club owners have a video that contradicts the version told by the general, who claims he was at the club for only 10 minutes in order to attend a friend's party.

The story about the video spread like wildfire yesterday, and club owner Kobi Mizrahi became one of the most sought after persons in Tel Aviv.

"Someone who identified himself as a media personality contacted me and told me he was willing to pay me NIS 300,000 for the tape," Mizrahi said. "When I told him I had better offers, he said he was willing to pay whatever it took. In any case, I will not sell it, not for a million shekels. What would this place [the club] be worth if people cannot enjoy privacy here?"

Mizrahi's club drew a great deal of attention yesterday, both from the media and from individuals. Journalists failed to interview one of the strippers who was at the club while the general was there.

In fact, had it not been for a photograph in the newspaper, no one at the club would have known it was Marom. "He arrived at about 9 P.M. that evening and stayed for about an hour," a source at the club said.

Mizrahi inherited the Go-Go Girls Club from his uncle Yosef, who was shot to death in 2001. Mizrahi insists the club is a properly registered business and is described by municipal authorities as having a license to host "artistic performances," more commonly known as peep shows.

A former senior Tel Aviv police officer described the uncle as "a violent man who ran escort services through blackmail, threats and by collecting protection money," and he served jail time for this. Kobi Mizrahi, however, is working hard to preserve a clean image.

He drives around town in a BMW and tries to present his club in positive light, and most of all, as a legitimate business.

"There is no prostitution at the club, end of story," a person who knows Kobi Mizrahi told Haaretz yesterday. "The strippers come to work each night, make a lot of money. There is a law student, an acting student, and even someone who used to be a policewoman a few years ago and changed careers."

Police are familiar with the activities at Go-Go, and to date, there have been no complaints of prostitution or any other illegal activities at the club, Haaretz learned.

"Look, one does not need to be a detective in order to understand that whoever goes there can also have sex at some point in the evening - let's not be naive," said the former Tel Aviv police officer. "But if the police have not closed down the place, it means that someone is making certain the business is run well - quietly and discreetly."