Text size

Shula Zaken, the former head of Prime Minister Ehud Olmert's bureau, will be questioned by police again tomorrow in an effort to break her silence on the Talansky and Rishon Tours affairs. The police are recommending that she and Olmert be charged in the corruption cases.

Investigators believe Zaken was aware of Olmert's alleged criminal acts and even assisted in their commission. In the Talansky affair, Olmert allegedly accepted illicit funds over many years from Long Island businessman and fundraiser Morris Talansky.

The police are recommending that Zaken be charged as an accessory to bribery, fraud and breach of trust as well as money laundering. In the Rishon Tours case, Olmert allegedly obtained double funding for trips abroad from various organizations. The police have recommended charging Zaken as an accessory to fraud and breach of trust.

Zaken will be questioned at the Israel Police national fraud unit in Bat Yam. Police sources said that even though recommendations in both cases had already been submitted to the State Prosecutor's Office, further investigation was still needed. In addition, investigators are hoping that the indictment recommendations will pressure Zaken into answering their questions for the first time, in exchange for lesser charges. Associates of Zaken yesterday said they believe she will maintain her silence again tomorrow.

Zaken's attorney, Micha Fetman, said last week, after his client was instructed to meet with investigators again, that he did not rule out the possibility that Zaken would cooperate with detectives. "Only a stupid person doesn't reevaluate the situation when circumstances change."