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Recent prime ministers have adopted a very fitting custom: Touring the country during the intermediate days of the Passover holiday. Benjamin Netanyahu is just continuing this tradition, accompanied by his family.

The prime minister is also entitled to a vacation. It would be better if prime ministers rested more and were less active all year round, and gave themselves some time for thinking. And of course his wife and children also may take time off; they do not have to deprive themselves because the head of the family has responsibilities and obligations. After all, they have not been sentenced to house arrest in Jerusalem or Caesarea just because the husband and father wanted to be prime minister, and got what he wanted. The families of very important people also want to live, and that's their right, so why not give them a break?

Nevertheless, the trip north involves no small number of arrangements and preparations. The Shin Bet must get ready before the holiday and place dozens of guards, maybe hundreds, at the esteemed travelers' disposal.

The police must prepare to close roads, to direct the already heavy traffic, and thus make more traffic jams, making life even worse for the already upset motorists. Even die-hard Netanyahu fans, those willing to do anything for him and the country, are likely to lose their patience under such difficult circumstances.

What is the basic principle behind every trip? The well-known and universal principle that people want to escape routine and refresh their souls and bodies, breathe freely and enjoy the fresh air and rejuvenating atmosphere. But in this case, it is simply impossible to enjoy; it is almost impossible to breathe. The Netanyahu family will not derive any pleasure from their trip in the countryside - with the entire media hounding their footsteps.

True, I was never prime minister - what can I do about that now? - but I was a minister and opposition leader, who is also an official figure. I never knew I was such a symbol of sovereignty until I found myself surrounded by bodyguards and police - sometimes more, sometimes less, all based on the "situation assessments of the responsible authorities." I liked my bodyguards very much, but they were still a burden. Sometimes I ran away from them, and they chased me and overtook me, just like honor. When I stopped being an important person, I breathed deeply, took a vacation and started enjoying my trips.

Can the Netanyahus really enjoy their trip under these conditions?