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The new indictment that former Prime Minister Ehud Olmert now faces in the Holyland case comes on top of the three cases for which he is already standing trial. All three are now being heard in the Jerusalem District Court.

In one, Olmert is accused of having various nonprofit organizations fund the same overseas flights and then using the extra money to finance personal trips for himself and his family.

According to the indictment, this tactic netted him $92,164, which was deposited in his personal account at the Rishon Tours travel agency.

Prosecution witnesses are nearing the end of their testimony in this case, after which the defense will start presenting its case.

In the second case, Olmert is accused of receiving hundreds of thousands of shekels in cash-filled envelopes from American Jewish businessman Morris Talansky.

The money was allegedly deposited in a "secret fund" managed by attorney Uri Messer, one of Olmert's closest friends. Olmert is expected to argue in his defense that these payments were all legal donations to his various political campaigns.

In the third case, Olmert is charged with having abused his former position as industry and trade minister to confer various benefits on companies that hired the services of Messer.

The prosecution will argue that in helping the firms represented by Messer, Olmert was guilty of a conflict of interests.

Messer is due to begin his testimony next week, and the prosecution is expected to wrap up its case shortly thereafter. At that point, the defense will begin presenting its case.

Olmert is charged with various offenses in these cases, including aggravated fraud, falsifying corporate documents, breach of trust, tax evasion and lying to the state comptroller. He himself will be the main defense witness in all of them.