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It doesn't matter so much anymore whether or not Avigdor Lieberman joins the government. What does matter is Ehud Olmert's readiness to bring Lieberman into the arid bosom of his government. As we know, birds of a feather flock together.

Olmert no longer has trouble with the combination, and Lieberman's way in is already paved. Of all the conditions Lieberman has presented, there is no real obstacle left. Why should Kadima care about supporting a change in the method of government, while diverting attention from a failing prime minister to an omnipotent president with a foggy future? And what does Kadima care about taking unilateral moves off the agenda, when the convergence, may it rest in peace, has in any case been brought to an end? And what does Kadima care about stopping the evacuation of illegal outposts when it doesn't plan to evacuate them anyway, and they are only strengthening their grip? And what does Kadima care about supporting civil union when it knows that Shas has veto power?

Changing the method of government is intended to fortify the prime minister's position, but a premier like Olmert is worthy of removal, not strengthening. He was strong enough when he went out on the adventure in Lebanon; only three months ago he was too strong. It's the submissive Knesset that needs strengthening, now that it has been absent for three months.

When two people like Olmert and Lieberman work together, intent on mending the ways of Israeli democracy, democracy is better off staying away from them lest they distort it beyond repair. And democracy is better off asking by what method of government it will best manage to rid itself of the shame they are bringing upon it.

A rightist-nationalist-extremist party, living off xenophobia and primitive ideas, can be found in almost every country today. That's true here as well, and its name is Yisrael Beiteinu. Just five months ago, on the day the government was established, the party's chairman told the Knesset: "World War II ended with the Nuremberg trials and the leaders of the Nazi regime were executed; not just them, but also their collaborators. Just as [Pierre] Laval in France was executed, I hope that this will be the fate of the collaborators in this house [the Knesset]. Just as they knew to mete out justice to Laval, thus should justice be meted out to you, in precisely the same way."

Although it is a week since the gates of heaven have been locked, we nonetheless ask forgiveness from all those neo-fascists; their sins are as white as snow compared to Lieberman and his deputy. None of Europe's racists have yet to recommend that any of his legally elected colleagues in parliament be executed. And now the bloody bridegroom is being invited into the black coalition canopy to tarnish an entire country. All those who hate Israel, all the anti-Semites, are rejoicing: the Jewish state is, with its own hands, marking them as kosher and granting them exemption. And Olmert has already announced that this groom is desirable.

Olmert is a desperate person if he wants to grab hold of a rotten straw. And what does the Labor Party have to say? Our assistance will not come from there.

The party will not withstand Amir Peretz, because Peretz is defeated and reeling, and someone who is himself on shaky ground can't come to a halt.

Once Golda Meir said in her usual sanctimonious way that we will never forgive the Arabs for making us kill them. And now, at the lowest ethical point that this country has ever seen, she might have rephrased her statement like this: We'll never forgive the Arabs for forcing us to kill ourselves.