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When Hana Siso, a single mother from Ashkelon, entered the polling station in a hotel in the city, supporters of all the candidates descended on her in an attempt to convince her to vote for their candidate. "When I am in distress and really need everyone to come, there is no one," she said. Siso insisted, "It can't be helped, I am voting for Dichter."

The booths set up at the entrance to the polling station reflected the polls: Those of Livni and Mofaz were impressive and lively, while those for Dichter and Sheetrit were modest and rather sleepy.

Up until 4 P.M., only 650 of the over 3,600 Kadima members in the city had voted, 17 percent of the total. Almost half of them arrived at the polls in rides arranged by Livni's campaign, which organized about 50 vehicles from volunteers and another six taxis.

A member of Mofaz's campaign staff could not give a number for how many voters his campaign had transported, but Ilana Gonen, a representative of the Dichter campaign, said "we are driving less. Our [party] members are able to own cars. On our end, the members pay for their membership," she added, needling the way Mofaz and Livni's camps recruited Kadima members.