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The Be'er Sheva District Labor Tribunal ordered a pimp to pay a prostitute more than NIS 40,000 in withheld wages.

Judge Judith Hoffman's ruling was based on the decision that employer-employee relations existed between the two.

The pimp has a criminal record for human trafficking for prostitution under aggravated circumstances, false imprisonment and hosting illegal aliens.

The woman, from the former Soviet Union, argued that the man had attempted to "sell" her the day after she arrived in Israel via Egypt.

But since the sale did not go through, the man decided to employ her as a prostitute, she told the court.

She did not have a residence permit; her passport stayed in Egypt.

The prosecution said the defendant was paid NIS 250 by each of the woman's clients, but that he gave the woman nothing for the first two weeks, claiming that she had to cover her travel expenses.

After two weeks, he began to pay her NIS 20 to NIS 30 per client.

The pimp argued that there was no employer-employee relationship, because he had not directly supervised her.

The judge found that although unusual, the relationship did have some aspects of a employer-employee relationship, since the woman performed work for the pimp and brought him profit.

Therefore, the judge ruled, "The complainant should be awarded appropriate wages - the payment the man received from her many clients, minus the amount she was paid after the first two weeks."

Since the complainant did not name a sum for emotional pain and suffering, her claim for such compensation was rejected.