Netanyahu and Berlusconi - Reuters - June 13, 2011
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi at a Rome press conference, June 13, 2011. Photo by Reuters
Text size

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu went to Italy in search of love. Who is more suitable for making love with than Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi, who at 74 doesn’t miss an opportunity to pay tribute to his masculine potency?

In his search for legitimacy, far from the anti-Israeli automatic majority in the United Nations, as he puts it, Netanyahu skipped over the White House, over U.S. President Barack Obama's head, directly into the laps of AIPAC's automatic majority on Capitol Hill.

From there he popped over for a team-building retreat in Safed, and now he is embracing one of the most dubious leaders in the world.

Berlusconi is obviously the first man the leading British weekly The Economist adorned its cover with the honorable verb "screwed."

Above the smug image of the Italian billionaire hangs the headline "The man who screwed an entire country." The authoritative magazine's special project shows how Berlusconi reduced Italy's world status to that of a Third World country.

The relationship between Netanyahu and Berlusconi is an alliance of rejects:
They both feel that the media and the left are hunting them down due to their hatred seeped in jealousy. They both have thick skin and they are both mainly busy with political survival.

Over a year ago, Berlusconi dragged a group of Italian ministers behind him to show the Italian people how much we Israelis love him.

It is difficult to think of other Western-Liberal countries standing in line to roll out a red carpet before the hedonistic Italian. It is difficult to think of other Western-Liberal countries whose leaders are standing in line for a photo-op with Netanyahu, Yisrael Katz and Limor Livnat.

Tell me who your friends in the world are, and I'll tell you how screwed your country is.

It is curious what the Italian masses, who were pushed below the poverty line by Berlusconi's financial policies, think about the Jewish mind. They are surely asking themselves, what exactly are the Israelis looking for now?

Only recently, their leader received a sharp political blow in the local and regional elections that took place in some of the Italian cities and councils, which were depicted by Berlusconi himself as a personal and political test of trust. Even in Eracura, Berlusconi's home region, his party's candidate suffered a shocking defeat. Milano, the capital of Berlusconi's financial empire, turned its back on him.

Berlusconi surely owes Netanyahu a favor for going to comfort him during these difficult days.

The pictures of the Israeli guests added variety to the news coverage of the bribery trial and of the charges of soliciting an under-aged teenager to into prostitution and abuse of authority.

When you love someone, you do not lose your head over inconsequential disagreements.

Who remembers that nearly a year ago, ahead of his visit to Israel, Berlusconi told Haaretz that the settlement policy may be an obstacle to peace?

"Israel's settlement policy could be an obstacle to peace. I would like to say to the people and government of Israel, as a friend, with my hand on my heart, that persisting with this policy is a mistake."

When you love someone, the settlements are less of an obstacle.

When you're in love, who needs peace?