Frazier Glenn Cross, accused of killing three people outside of Jewish sites near Kansas City.
Glenn Miller, aka Frazier Glenn Cross, accused of killing three people outside of Jewish sites near Kansas City. Photo by AP
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Glenn Miller, the suspect in the killing of three people Sunday at Jewish facilities in Kansas, was a Hitler admirer and Ku Klux Klan leader so well known that he had been interviewed on the popular Howard Stern and Alan Colmes talk shows, as well as in Sacha Baron Cohen's movie "Bruno."

Miller, 73, whose real name is Frazier Glenn Cross, was arrested in Overland Park, a suburb of Kansas City, after allegedly shooting to death Reat Griffin Underwood, 14, and his grandfather, Dr. William Corporon, outside the local Jewish Community Center, then driving about a mile to Village Shalom, a retirement community, where he shot and killed a woman.

After his arrest, a local TV station filmed Miller sitting in a police car yelling "Heil Hitler."

In his autobiography, "A White Man Speaks Out," Miller wrote of his plans for the Carolina Knights of the Ku Klux Klan, which he founded in 1980: “I would try to emulate Hitler’s methods of attracting members and supporters. In the years to come, for example, I placed great emphasis on staging marches and rallies. It had been successful with Hitler.”

Before that, Miller had spent 20 years on active duty in the U.S. Army, including 13 as a Green Beret, and served two tours in Vietnam before retiring in 1979 as a master sergeant. He left the army under pressure because of his burgeoning Klan activities, according to the website of the Southern Poverty Law Center, which had a series of run-ins with him. .

He joined the National Socialist Party of America, a Nazi group that killed members of the Communist Workers Party in North Carolina. Miller and his family began getting death threats, prompting his wife to take their children and leave him.

A series of confrontations with the law led to Miller's being tear-gassed out of a weapons-laden mobile home in Missouri, then serving a three-year term in federal prison.

The SPLC website's "intelligence file" on him reads: "Miller claims he read a racist newspaper for the first time in the early 1970s when his father gave him a copy of The Thunderbolt, published by Ed Fields of the racist, anti-Semitic National States’ Rights Party. According to Miller, within two minutes of browsing through the tabloid, he knew he “had found a home within the American White Movement. I was ecstatic.”

Along the way, Miller forged ties with The Order, whose members assassinated Denver talk show host Alan Berg, who was Jewish, in 1984. Three years later, according to SCLC, Miller "mailed a declaration to supporters, exhorting 'Aryan warriors of The Order' to kill 'our enemies,' and established a point system for each kill. The targets were: 'Niggers (1), White race traitors (10), Jews (10), Judges (50) Morris Seligman Dees (888),'" the latter being the SCLC's founder.

On Miller's website is a 2010 essay he wrote titled, "Attention White Youth!" It concludes: "Hail Victory and Sieg Heil to you all. Respectfully, Glenn Miller - PS: It is my fondish [sic] wish, that one day in future, my spirit will rise from my grave, and you will all know that I was right. . . . as you march, shoulder to shoulder to freedom from jewish bondage and from the nightmares the jews plan for you."