Google Maps screen-capture featuring Adolf-Hitler-Platz, from Tech Crunch
Google Maps screen-capture featuring Adolf-Hitler-Platz, from Tech Crunch. Photo by Tech Crunch
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Google's map service mistakenly listed a street in Berlin, Germany as Adolf-Hitler-Platz, correcting the mistake only a few days later, Tech Crunch reported Saturday.
 
The source of the mistake is due to the open nature of Google Maps, which lets anybody suggest changes. On January 2, an anonymous user suggested Theodor-Heuss Platz, named after Germany's first federal president, be named after Hitler instead. 
 
The suggestion was reviewed by Google's moderator "Vishali," who not only approved it, but made it the canonical street name, and not the secondary name as suggested by the anonymous user. 
 
In Vishali's credit, who approved some 24,000 suggestions in the last 550 days, according to Tech Crunch, it may be that he was simply too swamped to notice. 
 
The mistake was not altogether baseless, as Theodor-Heuss Platz was indeed named after the Nazi dictator between 1933 right until the end of the Second World War, according to the Daily Mail. 
 
According to a Google representative, the company took down the changed name shortly after it was discovered by Google Maps users. 
 
"In this particular case, the change in the street name was mistakenly approved, and we fixed it as soon as we were made aware. We apologize for any offence caused," reads a statement provided by Google.