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Kadima chairwoman Tzipi Livni criticized the Likud on Wednesday as a party that offers little in the way of new ideas to the public.

"I saw the Likud list of candidates this morning and I said to myself, 'Ah, now I am reminded of why we left the party whose platform starts with "what we won't do" rather than with "what we will do"'," Livni told a gathering of Kadima activists in Tel Aviv on Wednesday.

"I remember when there were [Likud] rebels and we couldn't come to agreements on diplomatic and social issues, and then we said we're going to Kadima," Livni said. "I know why the Likud is not an alternative for advancing anything in Israel. The public has already been in this movie of the Likud."

"Kadima will attain a list that one can be proud of and will accompany me to the premiership of Israel," Livni said in the opening of her remarks.

Tzahi Hanegbi, a senior Kadima legislator and campaign strategist, said the "real Likud" had emerged from the party election.

"Netanyahu's dream team became his nightmare. The stars are out and the rebels are in," Hanegbi said, referring to Kahlon and others who fought against then-Likud chief Ariel Sharon surrounding the 2005 disengagement from Gaza.

Political analyst Hanan Crystal said Netanyahu had hoped a less hawkish profile for Likud would help the party capture more centre ground from Kadima, which has been slipping in the polls since October.

"Netanyahu understands that battle lines with Kadima have been drawn in the fight for ... the 10 to 15 parliamentary seats determined by votes from the moderate right and center," Crystal told Israel Radio.