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The Swedish journalist who wrote a controversial article claiming Israel Defense Forces soldiers kill Palestinians in order to harvest their organs is reportedly reconsidering his views after a recent visit to Israel, Army Radio reported on Thursday.

Donald Bostrom, according to the report, recently withdrew from participating in an anti-Israel conference to be held in Beirut, citing his recent, and highly contentious, participation in a media-affairs conference in southern Israel as the cause.

"The visit to Israel and the fact that I was part of a fair dialogue made me rethink the whole issue," the Aftonbladet journalist reportedly told close aides.

At the media conference in Dimona, where Bolstrom was frequently interrupted by hecklers, the Swedish journalist admitted he had no proof beyond the allegations of the families of Palestinians killed by the Israeli army.

His interviewer, Israeli television presenter Yair Lapid, questioned Bostrom's journalistic ethics and accused him of being an anti-Semite "because you are willing to believe the Israeli government would take part in such atrocities."

Bostrom said, "In Sweden, like myself ... we strongly support Israel's right to exist in peace. If you violate the rules ... we have a tradition to criticize. The fact is that the families said what they said. That's a normal article," Bostrom said.

At the time, Bostrom commended the organizers for inviting him and giving him a chance to defend his work in Israel.

Ze'ev Finer, the director of a crisis management firm, and the one responsible for Bolstrom's arrival at the conference, said the report of the Swedish journalist's withdrawal from the Beirut conference was proof inviting him was the right thing to do.

"It's hardly a secret that a lot of people thought it was wrong to bring Bolstrom to the Dimona conference last week, but today we see that the decision to invite him over was right and provides Israel with excellent public relations," Finer said, adding that one only wishes "we had invited him two weeks earlier."