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A Gallup poll examining Muslim integration in major European countries has shown that Muslims identify more strongly with the countries they live in than the average in the population.

The global study of interfaith relations showed that more than two-thirds of Muslims living in Britain, Germany and France state they are loyal to the countries they live in, even though they identify equally strongly with their religion.

However, in what the report described as a "gulf of misunderstanding", only about between 30 per cent of the total population in the three countries believed that Muslims were loyal to the state.

More communication between both sides was needed to cultivate a better understanding of how Muslims in Europe tended to reconcile their typically high degree of religiosity with their largely secular environments, said the study.

Gallup said the data indicated that there was enough common ground and willingness on both sides to improve the dialogue.

"Muslims are very likely - often more likely than the general public - to express confidence in democratic institutions and a desire to live in neighborhoods with mixed ethnic and religious backgrounds," it said.

The report's authors said the study showed that religion and national identity were complementary rather than competing.

"This research shows that many of the assumptions about Muslims and integration are wide of the mark," said the study.

In Germany, which has a strong Turkish population, the trust placed by Muslims in the state's institutions "proves that strong religious beliefs don't translate into a lack of loyalty."