Children in school
Children in primary school Photo by Daniel Bar On
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The children of parents from the Commonwealth of Independent States outperformed the children of native-born Israelis by around 30 points in math, 20 points in science and 40 points in English on the national Meitzav achievement tests, when the scores are analyzed according to socioeconomic background.

The children of immigrants from the CIS perform comparably with their classmates with sabra parents on the tests in mathematics and in science and technology administered in the fifth and eighth grades, and even outscore their Israeli peers by an average of 15 to 20 points on the English-language portion of the exams. But on the Hebrew-language part of the test they score an average of 20 to 30 points lower than children whose parents were born in Israel. But this gap narrows after adjustments are made for socioeconomic differences, especially among students from the lower end of the socioeconomic spectrum.

When the test scores are analyzed according to socioeconomic background, the children of parents from the CIS outscored the children of native-born Israelis in math, science and English by 30, 20 and 40 points respectively. And when the analysis compared the scores of children whose parents had fewer than 12 years of school, the children of immigrants from the CIS scored higher than the children of native Israelis in all subjects, with the exception of the eighth-grade Hebrew-language test.

The results were similar for the Program for International Student Assessment tests, administered in elementary and middle school. Among 15-year-olds, the children of immigrants from the CIS tested below the average for Hebrew-speaking schools, but again, when the comparison was according to socioeconomic status these children outscored their peers with native-Israeli parents.