Leftist protesters in Tel Aviv on Saturday, June 5, 2010.
Leftist protesters in Tel Aviv on Saturday, June 5, 2010. Photo by Nir Keidar
Text size
related tags

The Knesset plenum voted Wednesday to order the House Committee to consider establishing a parliamentary panel of inquiry into left-wing Israeli organizations that allegedly participate in delegitimization campaigns against Israel Defense Forces soldiers.

Forty-seven legislators voted in favor of the motion while 16 voted against.

The initiative, brought forth by Foreign Minister Avigdor Lieberman's Yisrael Beiteinu faction, called primarily to investigate the sources of funding for these groups. The panel will essentially be charged with looking into where these groups have been attaining their funds, particularly whether this money is coming from foreign states or even organizations deemed to be involved in terrorist activities.

The knesset's approval of the proposal comes after Attorney General Yehuda Weinstein ruled in August that no investigation should be launched against such groups. The initiative has been met with anger from both the opposition and human rights groups.

The discussion at the Knesset on Wednesday was charged, filled with heckling and interruptions. A significant number of security guards were on hand to prevent physical altercations between the opposing members of Knesset.

MK Fania Kirshenbaum (Yisrael Beiteinu ), who submitted the proposal, alleged during the debate that the groups targeted for investigation were to blame for foreign actions aimed at delegitimizing Israel and its officials.

"These groups provide material to the Goldstone commission [which investigated the Gaza war] and are behind the indictments lodged against Israeli officers and officials around the world," Kirshenbaum said, referring to a series of arrest warrants issued over the last few years.

"They are trying to silence the very people who administrate the State of Israel's foreign relations," she declared. "These organizations are responsible for branding IDF soldiers as war criminals and encourage defamations."

In her presentations, Kirshenbaum singled out one group which she claimed went into local Israeli schools to convince pupils that "joining the IDF is unethical" and to advise them how to dodge conscription. A panel of inquiry, said Kirshenbaum, would investigate just who was in charge of the bodies providing these Israeli groups with financial assistance.

While Yisrael Beiteinu had garnered a majority in favor of the proposal before it was brought to vote, the matter raised the ire of human rights groups and left-wing politicians alike.

Meretz MK Nitzan Horowitz called the initiative "a shame on the Knesset", declaring Tuesday that: "The persecution campaign against human rights and citizens rights groups has reached a new low."

The purpose of such a committee was essentially to silence criticism, Horowitz said, a move that should be seen as, "a brutal act of political persecution using a coalition majority and Knesset funding, under the legal guise of an investigation committee."

"Human rights and citizens rights group save the honor of Israel in the world and maintain its character as a democratic state," Horowitz said. "It is moves like that being led by Yisrael Beiteinu that lead to Israel's delegitimization in the world and present Israeli democracy as fake. All to whom Israeli democracy is dear must oppose this committee of persecution."

Sixteen human rights groups signed an open letter protesting the initiative, including ACRI, B'Tselem, Yesh Din, Machsom Watch, Adalah, Mossawa Center, Ir Amim and Hotline for Migrant Workers.

"Investigate us all, we have nothing to hide. You are invited to read our reports and our publications. We will be happy if for a change you relate in a germane way to our questions instead of trying to besmirch us. It did not work in the past and it will not work this time," the letter said.