Anat Kamm is released from prison on January 26, 2014, after serving more than two years.
Anat Kamm is released from prison on January 26, 2014, after serving more than two years. Photo by Nir Keidar
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Anat Kamm, a former Israeli soldier who was convicted of stealing classified military documents and giving them to a Haaretz journalist, was released Sunday morning after serving over two years in prison.

"I feel great," Kamm told reporters as she left prison, "I plan on catching up on sleep. I haven't slept much for the past few nights."

In an answer to a reporter's question, Kamm said, in retrospect, she "would have done many things differently."

According to Walla News, an activist yelled out, "You betrayed your country. In any other normal country they would have locked you away for life."

The Israel Prison Service's parole board on January 16 approved Kamm's early release for good behavior. She was initially sentenced to four and a half years in prison, which she began serving at Neve Tirza Prison, Israel's only female jail, on November 23, 2011, and one and a half years suspended sentence.

On December 31, 2012 the Supreme Court shortened her sentence to three and a half years in jail, and another year and a half suspended sentence, as per the original punishment.

The two years she spent under house arrest were not configured into the sentence, which was issued on October 30, 2011.

Kamm was convicted in February 2011 of collecting, holding and passing on classified information without authorization to Haaretz journalist Uri Blau. Originally, Kamm was charged with espionage, but the conviction was reduced under a plea bargain.

Blau, meanwhile, was sentenced under a plea bargain to four months community service for possessing classified military documents. Blau admitted to possessing secret intelligence, without intent to harm national security. A Tel Aviv court approved the plea deal in September 2012.

Kamm filed a 2.6 million shekel ($744,000) lawsuit last April against Haaretz, Blau, Haaretz Publisher Amos Schocken and the paper's former Deputy Editor Avi Zilberberg.

The suit claimed that Haaretz was negligent in publishing reproductions of the classified documents she passed on to Blau as part of his report, and that this exposed her as the source. Haaretz has said it would respond to Kamm's claims in court.