Egypt Nov. 27, 2011 (Reuters)
A protester shouts slogans during a demonstration against the Egyptian military council in Cairo's Tahrir Square, Nov. 27, 2011. Photo by Reuters
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Egypt's Muslim Brotherhood said that the country's peace treaty with Israel needs re-evaluation by the country's new parliament, in press remarks by a senior member of the group published Friday.

"A long time has passed since the Camp David accord was signed, and like the other agreements it needs to be reviewed, and this is in the hands of the parliament," said Mahmoud Hussein, the group's secretary-general.

"The brotherhood believes the treaty is of great importance, but it is not on the top of our list. There are other priorities for the time being," Hussein told the regional Asharq al-Awsat daily.

"Generally, Israel does not honor the agreement," he added.

He denied a report saying that the Muslim Brotherhood had reached an understanding with the United States and Israel on "the importance of safeguarding the peace treaty with Israel."

Last week, Israel expressed concern at the gains of Islamist parties in the first round of Egypt's parliamentary elections and urged any future government to uphold the 1979 peace treaty.

Islamists made big gains during the initial round of the first elections since a popular revolt this year forced former president Hosni Mubarak out of power.

The Freedom and Justice Party, the brotherhood's political wing, was in the lead with 36.5 per cent of the vote. It was followed by the hard-line Salafist party, Al-Nour, with 24 per cent.