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The attorneys of former president Moshe Katsav, who faces a series of sex crime charges including rape, on Tuesday downplayed the results of a polygraph test that the primary complainant had passed.

"The test is untenable and irrelevant," said Attorney Zion Amir as to the results, which indicate that Katsav had a sexual contact with former President's Residence employee, known as A., who accused him of rape.

Amir also rejected A.'s claims that the test applied to the rape charges, and said they only had to do with her allegations of sexual contact.

State Prosecution sources said that the polygraph test does not necessarily imply criminal liability, and the two might have just had an affair. They also said that despite the test, A.'s testimony will not be included in the revised indictment against Katsav currently drafted by the Prosecution.

For his part, A.'s attorney Ariel Bendor urged Attorney General Menachem Mazuz to reconsider his refusal to confront her with the ex-president, in order to shed more light on the investigation.

Meanwhile, it emerged Monday that Katsav has asked the Treasury to finance a luxury vehicle and a lavish Tel Aviv office.

He asked the Finance Ministry to finance a black Audi A6, worth roughly 300,000 shekels, along with a 150 square-meter office in Tel Aviv's Azrieli tower that would cost tax payers hundreds of thousands of shekels a year.

Former presidents receive from the state a yearly stipend worth approximately 1.175 million shekels, meant to pay for housing, office space, a car and driver, and personal assistants.

Three months ago, Katsav surprisingly rejected a plea bargain struck with the state prosecution, whereby he would have admitted to sexual misconduct in return for a suspended sentence.

Should Katsav be convicted of a crime involving moral turpitude according to the revised indictment, his state benefits will be revoked.