Obama speaking in Chicago
U.S. President Barack Obama gives his election night victory rally speech in Chicago, November 7, 2012. Photo by Reuters
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U.S. President Barack Obama was reelected for a second term after a tight race against Republican candidate Mitt Romney. In his rousing victory speech to a packed crowd in Chicago, he thanked voters for electing him to another term and congratulated his Republican opponents for a hard-fought battle.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu congratulated President Barack Obama on his victory in the U.S. elections, in a special message released just moments after the results were announced.

Bradley Burston argues that, even though in theory Obama's grueling months of campaigning ended on Tuesday night, if early indications hold, over the next 11 weeks, the president may still have one more campaign opponent to face – Benjamin Netanyahu.

Meanwhile, Amos Harel writes that Iran will take center stage again on the new-old president's agenda. U.S. elections are decided on domestic issues, he writes, but even on his second term Obama cannot afford to allow a radical regime to acquire nuclear weapons.

Israel may initiate a building drive in West Bank settlements, as a possible sanction against the Palestinian Authority, should the PA request permanent observer-state status at the United Nations General Assembly at the end of the month.

The British government condemned the tenders recently issued by Israel's Housing Ministry for the construction of new housing units across the Green Line in Jerusalem and in West Bank settlements.

The Prosecutor's Office declared that it would cancel all charges against a Beit Hanina youth who was held in custody for three weeks on false charges of aggravated assault, after closed-circuit television footage proved that two Border Police officers lied to the court from the start.

Syrian rebels fired mortar shells at President Bashar Assad's palace in Damascus, but missed, in an attack underlining the growing boldness of forces fighting to end his family's 42 years in power.