Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu.
Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Photo by Emil Salman
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Just hours ahead of a Tel Aviv protest over the ultra-Orthodox enlistment crisis that has engulfed Israeli politics, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced that he would debate the recommendations of the Plesner Committee, tasked with replacing the law governing Haredi enlistment, with his Likud faction on Sunday - after he disbanded the committee earlier this week.

Netanyahu is looking for a magic formula to satisfy Mofaz and the ultra-Orthodox. The PM must come up with a way to keep the head of Kadima and the Haredi parties in his coalition after the Plesner Committee debacle that won't cause him irreparable damage come election time.

Voters headed to the polls across Libya on Saturday to elect a 200-seat National Congress, which will have legislative powers and appoint a new government, amid fears of violence and calls for boycott in eastern cities.

Syrian artillery hit villages in northern Lebanon on Saturday killing two women and a man and wounding scores more after opposition rebels crossed the border into Lebanon, residents said.

Iran's Parliament Speaker Ali Larijani said on Saturday that no bill has yet been prepared for blocking the Strait of Hormuz, the strategic oil export waterway. A threatened blockade of the Strait by Iran is theoretically possible but the move would not only stop of Iran's oil exports - the country's main source of income - but also increase the likelihood of a military confrontation with the United States.

On Friday, divestment supporters in the the Presbyterian General Assembly received some good news as the assembly passed a resolution to boycott settlement goods ("Ahava" cosmetics and "Hadiklaim" products), and also voted to accept a recommendation to create an option for individual pension holders not to chose to invest in Caterpillar, Motorola, and Hewlett Packard stock, as "choice of conscience" - to be voted on at the next General Assembly in 2014.

 Finally, after its completion was postponed twice due to a shortage of finances, the Museum of the History of Polish Jews will open in autumn next year, thanks to two donations announced this week by Poland's Minster of Culture and National Heritage, Bogdan Zdrojewski. Already by April 2013, on the 70th anniversary of the Warsaw ghetto uprising, the public will have an opportunity to visit a large portion of the exhibition.