Israeli print journalism starts feeling the pinch
Israeli print journalism starts feeling the pinch Photo by Bloomberg
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"Unnecessary" or a "basic demand"? With the World Economic Forum in Davos around the corner, President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu are in deep disagreement over the necessity of Palestinian recognition of Israel as a Jewish state.

The Health Ministry has begun limiting the number of subsidized in vitro fertilization treatments, with Health Minister Yael German maintaining the new rules strike a balance between women's reproductive rights and public health considerations. 

The Israeli newspaper industry is starting to feel the pinch of shrinking readership after bucking the global downward trend for a long time, according to a 2013 survey. 

The director of the ORT school system who threatened to fire a teacher who expressed "extreme leftist views" in class was active in the right-wing Habayit Hayehudi party.  

Rabbi Yoshiyahu Pinto, who is suspected of bribing Maj. Gen. Menashe Arviv, posted a rebuttal on Facebook calling the possible charges against him "terrible persecution" and "bloodshed that we have been made to suffer." 

The state spent eight million shekels in 2013 subsidizing state employees' trips to Europe for "Holocaust education" that are essentially five-day vacations.  

Ethiopian-born Israeli duo, Kafe Shahor Hazak bubbles over on YouTube. The rappers refuse to agree with the clichéd perception that their rap music reflects urban distress and neglect. 

Fox Television Network has decided to make a new TV series about Syrian President Bashar Assad in Israel, with Kfar Sava beating Herzliya Studios in a bid to host filming.