Adolf Hitler's 'Mein Kampf.'
Adolf Hitler's 'Mein Kampf.' Photo by AP
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After six months of legal maneuvering, the Israeli government released a very partial list of the recipients of its arms sales over the past two years, revealing more than $7 billion in sales but very few names.

The Israeli government is financing the construction of an archaeological park on the ancient site of Tel Rumeida, located in the heart of the Palestinian city of Hebron, while critics on left blast project as cover for expansion of city’s Jewish settlement.

Fearing being blamed for the peace talks' failure, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is searching for a way to tell John Kerry "yes," while somehow keeping his coalition intact.

Israel's Defense Ministry has refused to allow the operation of a landfill intended to serve the Palestinian population south of Jerusalem.

The Israel Defense Forces attacked a terrorist cell in the southern Gaza Strip as it was in final preparations to launch a high-trajectory weapon at Israeli troops near the border fence.

Israel's Chief Rabbinate has disqualified yet another North American Orthodox rabbi; the institution recently refused to recognize Rabbi Scot Berman in vouching for the Jewishness of a woman from his community in Toronto who had come to Israel to marry.

Controversial French humorist Dieudonne M'bala M'bala, known for his anti-Semitic remarks and Nazi-like salute, is allowed to perform in the city of Nantes after a ban against him is overturned.

Sales of Mein Kampf, Nazi leader Adolf Hitler's memoir, have surged to the top of Amazon and iTunes seller charts. Boston journalist Chris Faraone says the rise of the ebook, which allows readers discretion, may explain this phenomenon.